Search
  • Martha Rasche

Don't Give In to Feeling Overwhelmed


These dreary winter days provide the perfect time to start writing your life stories. That is how I think of them, a succession of short accounts rather than one lonnnng story. Setting out to write multiple stories about different, even random, aspects of my life seems less overwhelming than planning to write my singular, definitive LIFE STORY.

People who have heard me talk on this subject shared these suggestions for making the process even less daunting:

1. When sending a birthday card to a grandchild or great-grandchild — even one as young as 3 or 4 — include a note about something you did at that age or that the child’s parent whom you raised did at that age.

2. When a new grandbaby is born, write a note to the baby’s older sibling, letting that child know he or she isn’t being overlooked. Include a short story about someone else who once became a big sister or big brother — you!

3. Write one short story about just one aspect of your life and give copies of it to your children. You don’t have to promise them or yourself another installment. If you do write another story later, again make copies and distribute them.

I don't have children/grandchildren, but I have nieces, nephews, great-nieces and a great-nephew. I would apply these same tips to any loved one of a younger generation.

#writing

28 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

I picked up another bound copy of life stories from the printer earlier this month. This time the stories are of my 97-year-old harmonica teacher. ​ Decades before Lucille helped me learn to play t

If you don’t have very important plans for 9 o’clock (Eastern time) tonight, I urge you to watch the PBS documentary about the mental health of adolescents. It’s a Ken Burns presentation, “Hiding in P

As a child, my bedtime ritual — after brushing my teeth in the only bathroom our family of 11 had — started by dipping the fingers of my right hand into the holy water font that hung on the wall near