Search
  • Martha Rasche

Avoid the Telephone Game


Writing your life story allows you to share it in your own words, from your own perspective.

Are you familiar with the telephone game? Where one person whispers something to the next person, and that person whispers it to the next, and so on and so on until the last person in the circle hears it? That person then says aloud what she heard. If you’ve ever played that game, you know that what the last person heard is often way different than what the first person said!

Writing your own story, in your own words, makes sure that your grandchildren and great-grandchildren or great-nieces and great-nephews or whoever it is who reads your stories hears the story CORRECTLY, from the point of view of the person who lived it.

#writing

12 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

I picked up another bound copy of life stories from the printer earlier this month. This time the stories are of my 97-year-old harmonica teacher. ​ Decades before Lucille helped me learn to play t

If you don’t have very important plans for 9 o’clock (Eastern time) tonight, I urge you to watch the PBS documentary about the mental health of adolescents. It’s a Ken Burns presentation, “Hiding in P

As a child, my bedtime ritual — after brushing my teeth in the only bathroom our family of 11 had — started by dipping the fingers of my right hand into the holy water font that hung on the wall near